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Bile acid and lysolecithin concentrations in the stomach in patients with duodenal ulcer before operation and after treatment by highly selective vagotomy, partial gastrectomy, or truncal vagotomy and drainage
  1. P Dewar,
  2. R King,
  3. D Johnston

    Abstract

    Duodenogastric reflux of bile acids and lysolecithin in the course of a standard test meal was measured in normal people and in patients with duodenal ulcer before operation and more than one year after highly selective vagotomy, Polya partial gastrectomy, truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty, and truncal vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy. Before operation, duodenal ulcer patients had significantly higher fasting, post-prandial, and peak bile acid concentrations in the stomach than had normal subjects. After Polya partial gastrectomy, fasting, post-prandial, and peak concentrations of bile acids and lysolecithin were significantly higher than in preoperative duodenal ulcer patients. After highly selective vagotomy, in contrast, bile acid concentrations in the stomach were significantly lower than in preoperative duodenal ulcer patients and post-prandial and peak lysolecithin concentrations were less than half (NS) those recorded in preoperative duodenal ulcer patients. After highly selective vagotomy, bile acid concentrations were also significantly lower than bile acid concentrations after Polya partial gastrectomy, truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty, and truncal vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy; and post-prandial and peak lysolecithin concentrations were significantly lower than after Polya partial gastrectomy and truncal vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy. Thus, when used in the treatment of patients with duodenal ulcer, highly selective vagotomy keeps `bile' out of the stomach, probably through its effect on gastric smooth muscle, combined with the preservation of an intact antropyloroduodenal segment. In contrast, Polya partial gastrectomy, truncal vagotomy and gastrojejunostomy, and truncal vagotomy and pyloroplasty all lead to a significant increase in reflux of bile acids and lysolecithin into the stomach. The clinical importance of these findings is that both gastritis and, in the long term, gastric carcinoma may prove to be less common after highly selective vagotomy than after partial gastrectomy or vagotomy with a drainage procedure.

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