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Gut 43:300 doi:10.1136/gut.43.2.300a
  • LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Helicobacter pylori: the African enigma

  1. I SEGAL,
  2. R ALLY
  1. Gastroenterology Unit,
  2. Department of Medicine,
  3. Baragwanath Hospital,
  4. University of the Witwatersrand,
  5. Johannesburg, South Africa
  6. National Cancer Registry of South Africa,
  7. Department of Tropical Diseases,
  8. School of Pathology of University of the Witwatersrand
  9. and the South African Institute for Medical Research,
  10. Johannesburg, South Africa
  11. Human Biochemistry Research Unit,
  12. Department of Tropical Diseases,
  13. School of Pathology of University of the Witwatersrand
  14. and the South African Institute for Medical Research,
  15. Johannesburg, South Africa
  1. Professor I Segal.
  1. F SITAS
  1. Gastroenterology Unit,
  2. Department of Medicine,
  3. Baragwanath Hospital,
  4. University of the Witwatersrand,
  5. Johannesburg, South Africa
  6. National Cancer Registry of South Africa,
  7. Department of Tropical Diseases,
  8. School of Pathology of University of the Witwatersrand
  9. and the South African Institute for Medical Research,
  10. Johannesburg, South Africa
  11. Human Biochemistry Research Unit,
  12. Department of Tropical Diseases,
  13. School of Pathology of University of the Witwatersrand
  14. and the South African Institute for Medical Research,
  15. Johannesburg, South Africa
  1. Professor I Segal.
  1. A R P WALKER
  1. Gastroenterology Unit,
  2. Department of Medicine,
  3. Baragwanath Hospital,
  4. University of the Witwatersrand,
  5. Johannesburg, South Africa
  6. National Cancer Registry of South Africa,
  7. Department of Tropical Diseases,
  8. School of Pathology of University of the Witwatersrand
  9. and the South African Institute for Medical Research,
  10. Johannesburg, South Africa
  11. Human Biochemistry Research Unit,
  12. Department of Tropical Diseases,
  13. School of Pathology of University of the Witwatersrand
  14. and the South African Institute for Medical Research,
  15. Johannesburg, South Africa
  1. Professor I Segal.

    Editor,—A major advance in gastroenterology was the discovery that Helicobacter pylori causes chronic active gastritis, and is associated with duodenal ulcers and with gastric cancer. In an international study on 17 populations from 13 countries, it was concluded that there is a roughly six-fold risk of gastric cancer in populations with 100% H pylori infection.1 2 In Africa, a puzzling feature is that although there is a very high prevalence of the infection, associated …