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Effect of bowel preparation and colonoscopy on post-procedure intestinal microbiota composition
  1. V Mai1,
  2. B Greenwald2,
  3. J Glenn Morris Jr3,
  4. J-P Raufman4,
  5. O C Stine5
  1. 1Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  2. 2Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  3. 3Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  4. 4Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  5. 5Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Greenebaum Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  1. Correspondence to:
    Dr V Mai
    Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Greenebaum Cancer Center, Rm 934-B MSTF, 10 S Pine St, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA; vmai{at}epi.umaryland.edu

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There is growing interest in the potential contributions of distortions in intestinal microbiota to human intestinal disease.1–5 Our understanding of intestinal microbiota complexity and dynamics is evolving, but is still in its infancy.6–8 We have previously shown that microflora profiles are (1) unique to an individual; (2) stable over a period of at least 8 weeks; and (3) not affected by minor short-term changes in diet.9

Little is known about (1) changes in microbiota in patients undergoing a screening colonoscopy; (2) if and when microbiota returns to its normal pre-colonoscopy composition; and (3) whether short-term distortions increase disease risks.

We investigated microbiota changes in five patients undergoing screening colonoscopy. Colon preparation was adequate and polyps were detected in two patients (A and E); congested mucosa with chronic inflammation and lymphatic infiltrate was detected in patient B, and the remaining two patients (C and D) had no abnormalities.

Analysis of the faecal microbiota by denaturing …

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