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Gut 55:388-394 doi:10.1136/gut.2005.075002
  • Liver disease

Clinical features and prognosis of primary biliary cirrhosis associated with systemic sclerosis

  1. C Rigamonti1,
  2. L M Shand2,
  3. M Feudjo3,
  4. C C Bunn2,
  5. C M Black2,
  6. C P Denton2,
  7. A K Burroughs1
  1. 1Liver Transplantation and Hepatobiliary Medicine, Royal Free Hospital, Hampstead, London, UK
  2. 2Centre for Rheumatology, Royal Free Hospital, Hampstead, London, UK
  3. 3London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, Medical Statistics Unit, London, UK
  1. Correspondence to:
    Professor A K Burroughs
    Liver Transplantation and Hepatobiliary Medicine, Royal Free Hospital, Pond St, Hampstead, London NW3 2QG, UK; Andrew.burroughs{at}royalfree.nhs.uk
  • Accepted 31 August 2005
  • Revised 31 July 2005
  • Published Online First 8 September 2005

Abstract

Backgrounds and aims: To evaluate the prognosis of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) together with systemic sclerosis (SSc), as this is unknown.

Methods and results: A PBC database of 580 patients identified 43 with PBC and SSc: two patients with PBC alone were matched to each PBC-SSc patient for serum bilirubin concentration at the initial visit. Forty (93%) patients had limited cutaneous SSc. At diagnosis of PBC, median values were: 49.7 years, bilirubin 17 μmol/l, and albumin 40.5 g/l. Liver diagnosis occurred a median 4.9 years after SSc in 24 (56%) patients. In matched patients, median values at diagnosis were: 53.2 years, bilirubin 12 μmol/l, and albumin 41 g/l. Median follow up was similar: 3.16 years (PBC-SSc) and 4.8 years (PBC alone). The risk of transplantation or death from diagnosis, adjusting for sex, age, log bilirubin, and alkaline phosphatase was significantly lower in PBC-SSc (hazard ratio 0.116, p = 0.01) due to less transplantation (hazard ratio 0.068, p = 0.006). The rate of bilirubin increase was less in PBC-SSc (p = 0.04). Overall survival was similar (hazard ratio 1.11, p = 0.948); there were nine deaths (21%) in PBC-SSc (six SSc related and two liver related) and nine (11%) in PBC alone (six liver related).

Conclusions: Liver disease has a slower progression in PBC-SSc compared with matched patients with PBC alone.

Footnotes

  • Published online first 8 September 2005

  • Conflict of interest: None declared.

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