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Gut 61:484-500 doi:10.1136/gutjnl-2011-300886
  • Guidelines

Guidelines for liver transplantation for patients with non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

  1. J S Wyatt17
  1. 1Department of NIHR Biomedical Research Unit and Centre for Liver Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
  2. 2Department of Medicine, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK
  3. 3SW Thames Renal and Transplantation Unit, London, UK
  4. 4Institute of Liver Studies, King's College Hospital, London, UK
  5. 5Liver Unit, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, UK
  6. 6Liver Unit, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, Birmingham, UK
  7. 7Department of Cardiology, Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
  8. 8Department of Pathology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
  9. 9British Liver Trust, Ringwood, UK
  10. 10Liver Unit, Birmingham Children's Hospital, Birmingham, UK
  11. 11Liver Unit, St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK
  12. 12NHS Blood and Transplant, Bristol, UK
  13. 13Centre for Hepatology, University College London, London, UK
  14. 14Department of Hepatology, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK
  15. 15Liver Unit, Royal Free Hospital, London, UK
  16. 16Centre for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK
  17. 17Department of Pathology, St James's University Hospital, Leeds, UK
  1. Correspondence to Dr P N Newsome, Centre for Liver Research, NIHR Biomedical Research Unit, Institute of Biomedical Research, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK; p.n.newsome{at}bham.ac.uk
  • Revised 16 November 2011
  • Accepted 1 December 2011
  • Published Online First 10 January 2012

Guideline development

Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is an increasing cause of liver disease necessitating liver transplantation. In patients with advanced NASH, there are often coexistent clinical issues that impact on the outcome of liver transplantation. There are no guidelines for the assessment and management of patients with NASH undergoing liver transplantation.

A group was therefore invited by the Council of the British Transplant Society (BTS) to prepare guidelines for the management of NASH before and after liver transplantation. The guideline is approved by the British Society of Gastroenterology, the British Association for the Study of Liver and NHS Blood and Transplant.

The first draft was written by Dr P N Newsome (senior lecturer and consultant hepatologist, Liver Unit, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust) in Autumn 2010 with contributions from the following guideline group: Dr Peter Henriksen (consultant cardiologist and honorary senior lecturer, Edinburgh Heart Centre, NHS Lothian, University Hospitals Division), Professor C P Day (Professor of Liver Medicine, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University), Dr D Thorburn (consultant hepatologist, Liver Unit, Royal Free Hospital, London), Mr D F Mirza (consultant hepatobiliary and transplant surgeon, Liver Unit, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust), Dr J W Ferguson (consultant hepatologist and honorary senior lecturer, Liver Unit, University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust), Dr G Auzinger (consultant intensive care medicine, Liver Intensive Therapy Unit, King's College Hospital London NHS Foundation Trust), Dr M Allison (consultant hepatologist, Liver Unit, Department of Medicine, Cambridge University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust), Dr J W Tomlinson (reader in endocrinology, Centre for Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, University of Birmingham), H Manley (British Liver Trust), Dr K J Simpson (senior lecturer in hepatology, University of Edinburgh and honorary consultant physician, Scottish Liver Transplantation Unit, Royal Infirmary Edinburgh), Professor S G Hubscher (Leith Professor and Professor of Hepatic Pathology, University of Birmingham, and …