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The presence of the anti-inflammatory protein MAM, from Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, in the intestinal ecosystem
  1. Elodie Quévrain1,2,3,
  2. Marie-Anne Maubert1,2,3,4,
  3. Harry Sokol5,6,1,2,3,
  4. Bart Devreese7,
  5. Philippe Seksik5,1,2,3
  1. 1Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 6, Paris, France
  2. 2Inflammation-Immunopathology-Biotherapy Department (DHU i2B), INSERM-ERL 1157, Paris, France
  3. 3UMR 7203 Laboratoire des Biomolécules, UPMC/CNRS/ENS, Paris, France
  4. 4Département PM2 Plateforme de Métabolomique, APHP, Hôpital Saint Antoine, Peptidomique et dosage de Médicaments, Paris, France
  5. 5Service de Gastroentérologie et nutrition, APHP, Hôpital Saint Antoine, Paris, France
  6. 6INRA, UMR1319 MICALIS, Jouy en Josas, France
  7. 7Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium
  1. Correspondence to Elodie Quévrain, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, ERL INSERM 1157, 27 rue de Chaligny, Paris 75012, France; elodie.quevrain{at}upmc.fr

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We recently reported in your journal the discovery of an anti-inflammatory protein produced by Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, a commensal bacterium involved in Crohn's disease (CD) dysbiosis.1 We wish to highlight and complete these recent data.

The involvement of the intestinal microbiota in the pathogenesis of CD is well recognised. It has been shown that dysbiosis (an imbalance in the composition of the intestinal microbiota) could participate in chronic and inappropriate activation of the intestinal immune system and lead to inflammation. Dysbiosis is characterised by a deficiency of certain bacteria, such …

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