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Green tea consumption and gastric cancer in Japanese: A pooled analysis of six cohort studies
  1. Manami Inoue (mnminoue{at}ncc.go.jp)
  1. Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Japan
    1. Shizuka Sasazuki
    1. Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Japan
      1. Kenji Wakai
      1. Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
        1. Takeshi Suzuki
        1. Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Japan
          1. Keitaro Matsuo
          1. Aichi Cancer Center Research Institute, Japan
            1. Taichi Shimazu
            1. Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Japan
              1. Ichiro Tsuji
              1. Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
                1. Keitaro Tanaka
                1. Faculty of Medicine, Saga University, Japan
                  1. Tetsuya Mizoue
                  1. Research Institute, International Medical Center of Japan, Japan
                    1. Chisato Nagata
                    1. Gifu University Graduate School of Medicine, Japan
                      1. Akiko Tamakoshi
                      1. Aichi Medical University School of Medicine, Japan
                        1. Norie Sawada
                        1. Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Japan
                          1. Shoichiro Tsugane
                          1. Research Center for Cancer Prevention and Screening, National Cancer Center, Japan

                            Abstract

                            Background: Previous experimental studies have suggested many possible anti-cancer mechanisms for green tea, but epidemiologic evidence for the effect of green tea consumption on gastric cancer risk is conflicting.

                            Objective: To examine the association between green tea consumption and gastric cancer.

                            Methods: We analyzed original data from six cohort studies that measured green tea consumption using validated questionnaires at baseline. Hazard ratios (HR) in the individual studies were calculated, with adjustment for a common set of variables, and combined using a random-effects model.

                            Results: During 2,285,968 person-years of follow-up of a total of 219,080 subjects, 3,577 gastric cancer cases were identified. Compared with those drinking <1 cup/day, no significant risk reduction for gastric cancer was observed with increased green tea consumption in men, even in stratified analyses by smoking status and subsite. In women, however, a significantly decreased risk was observed for those with consumption of ≥5 cups/day (multivariate-adjusted pooled HR =0.79, 95% confidence interval (CI) =0.65-0.96). This decrease was also significant for the distal subsite (HR=0.70, 95%CI=0.50-0.96). In contrast, a lack of association for proximal gastric cancer was consistently seen in both men and women.

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