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Familial fundic gland polyposis with gastric cancer
  1. Ritsuko Yanaru-Fujisawa1,
  2. Shotaro Nakamura1,
  3. Tomohiko Moriyama1,
  4. Motohiro Esaki1,
  5. Tadatoshi Tsuchigame2,
  6. Masaki Gushima3,
  7. Minako Hirahashi3,
  8. Eishi Nagai4,
  9. Takayuki Matsumoto1,
  10. Takanari Kitazono1
  1. 1Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
  2. 2Kumamoto General Health Center, Kumamoto, Japan
  3. 3Department of Anatomic Pathology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
  4. 4Department of Surgery and Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan
  1. Correspondence to Dr Shotaro Nakamura, Department of Medicine and Clinical Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Maidashi 3-1-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan; shonaka{at}intmed2.med.kyushu-u.ac.jp

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We read with interest the article by Worthley et al1 regarding a new autosomal dominant syndrome characterised by fundic gland polyposis (FGP) and gastric cancer, which was not associated with familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). We have experienced two similar cases of gastric adenocarcinoma occurring in pedigrees with familial FGP without FAP.

Case 1

A 56-year-old woman was referred to our institution for further investigation of her multiple gastric polyps. On admission, serology and 13C urea breath test yielded negative results for Helicobacter pylori. Upper gastrointestinal endoscopy revealed numerous fundic gland polyps covering the …

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