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Low-dose albumin in the treatment of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis: should we change the standard treatment?
  1. Alexandre de Araujo1,2,
  2. Antônio de Barros Lopes1,2,
  3. Gabriela Rossi1,
  4. Gabriel Veber da Silva3,
  5. Patrícia Ananias3,
  6. Sandro Ness1,
  7. Mário Reis Álvares-da-Silva1,2,3
  1. 1Gastroenterology Division, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, Brazil
  2. 2Gastroenterology and Hepatology Post-Graduate Course, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
  3. 3School of Medicine, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, Brazil
  1. Correspondence to Dr Alexandre de Araujo, Gastroenterology Division, Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Ramiro Barcelos, 2350, Porto Alegre 90035030, Brazil; araujo-ale{at}ig.com.br

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We read with interest the recent paper published on the management of patients awaiting liver transplant.1 The authors carried out a comprehensive review of liver complications, including spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP). They stated that intravenous albumin (IV-A) at a dose of 1.5 g/kg at diagnosis and 1 g/kg 48 h later has been shown to prevent renal impairment and reduces mortality. We would like to address this point as this benefit has only been demonstrated in one clinical trial in which an arbitrary dose of albumin was used.2 …

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