Article Text

PDF
Letter
Faecal microbiota transplantation donor stools need screening for poliovirus
  1. Peter Gerald Speck,
  2. James G Mitchell
  1. College of Science and Engineering, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, Australia
  1. Correspondence to Professor Peter Gerald Speck, College of Science and Engineering, Flinders University, Bedford Park, South Australia, Australia; peter.speck{at}flinders.edu.au

Statistics from Altmetric.com

We read with interest the recent report describing faecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) as an effective treatment for certain gastrointestinal diseases, such as Clostridium difficile infection,1 with its high burden and increasing frequency.2 In FMT, donor stools are screened for infectious diseases prior to use.3 Screening protocols are still developing. The protocol of Cammarota et al recognises as risky ‘recent (<6 months) history of vaccination with a live attenuated virus, if there is a possible risk of transmission’.1 We contend that this precaution needs extension to include donors who are chronic poliovirus excreters. …

View Full Text

Request permissions

If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways.