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Research outcomes in British gastroenterology: an audit of the subsequent full publication of abstracts presented at the British Society of Gastroenterology
  1. D S SANDERS,
  2. M J CARTER,
  3. D P HURLSTONE,
  4. A J LOBO
  1. Gastroenterology and Liver Unit
  2. Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK
  3. Department of Neuroradiology
  4. Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK
  1. Dr AJ Lobo, P Floor (Room P14), Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield S10 2JF, UK.alan.lobo{at}csuh.nhs.uk
  1. N HOGGARD
  1. Gastroenterology and Liver Unit
  2. Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK
  3. Department of Neuroradiology
  4. Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield, UK
  1. Dr AJ Lobo, P Floor (Room P14), Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Sheffield S10 2JF, UK.alan.lobo{at}csuh.nhs.uk

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Editor,—The presentation of abstracts at scientific meetings provides an opportunity to rapidly convey the results of novel research. It also allows the researcher a chance to receive informal peer review. This may help to clarify aspects of the work, particularly in the identification and correction of potential weaknesses prior to submission for full publication. Although abstracts submitted to conferences are peer reviewed, this process may not be as rigorous as that of an indexed journal considering publication of the full manuscript.1

Presentation of an abstract at a prestigious meeting may suggest that full publication is probable. Certainly, acceptance as opposed to rejection increases the likelihood of subsequent publication, but this is not absolute.2 Other medical specialities …

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