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Evidence for altered hepatic gluconeogenesis in patients with cirrhosis using in vivo 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy
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Authors

  • K K Changani aMagnetic Resonance Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, bDepartment of Imaging, Division of Investigative Sciences, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, cDivision of Medicine (Medicine A), Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, dMRC Biochemical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, 30 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • R Jalan aMagnetic Resonance Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, bDepartment of Imaging, Division of Investigative Sciences, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, cDivision of Medicine (Medicine A), Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, dMRC Biochemical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, 30 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • I J Cox aMagnetic Resonance Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, bDepartment of Imaging, Division of Investigative Sciences, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, cDivision of Medicine (Medicine A), Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, dMRC Biochemical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, 30 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • M Ala-Korpela aMagnetic Resonance Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, bDepartment of Imaging, Division of Investigative Sciences, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, cDivision of Medicine (Medicine A), Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, dMRC Biochemical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, 30 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • K Bhakoo aMagnetic Resonance Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, bDepartment of Imaging, Division of Investigative Sciences, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, cDivision of Medicine (Medicine A), Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, dMRC Biochemical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, 30 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • S D Taylor-Robinson aMagnetic Resonance Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, bDepartment of Imaging, Division of Investigative Sciences, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, cDivision of Medicine (Medicine A), Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, dMRC Biochemical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, 30 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  • J D Bell aMagnetic Resonance Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, bDepartment of Imaging, Division of Investigative Sciences, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, cDivision of Medicine (Medicine A), Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK, dMRC Biochemical and Clinical Magnetic Resonance Unit, Department of Biochemistry, University of Oxford, 30 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QU, UK PubMed articlesGoogle scholar articles
  1. Dr S D Taylor-Robinson, Magnetic Resonance Unit, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London W12 ONN, UK.s.taylor-robinson{at}ic.ac.uk
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Citation

Changani KK, Jalan R, Cox IJ, et al
Evidence for altered hepatic gluconeogenesis in patients with cirrhosis using in vivo 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy

Publication history

  • Accepted February 26, 2001
  • First published October 1, 2001.
Online issue publication 
October 01, 2001

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