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Living related liver transplantation: a Japanese experience and development of a checklist for donors' informed consent
  1. A Akabayashi,
  2. M Nishimori,
  3. M Fujita,
  4. B T Slingsby
  1. Department of Biomedical Ethics, School of Public Health, University of Kyoto Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan
  1. Correspondence to:
    Dr A Akabayashi, Department of Biomedical Ethics, School of Public Health, University of Kyoto Graduate School of Medicine, Yoshida-Konoe-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan;
    akirasan{at}pbh.med.kyoto-u.ac.jp

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In the February 2002 issue of Gut, Broelsch et al argued for a controversial therapy of living related liver transplantation (Gut 2002; 50:143). The Japanese experience is somewhat different from those of other countries, as indicated in the article. Japan has long been the subject of sociocultural studies because of its delay in using the organs of brain dead persons for transplantation purposes. Since the Organ Transplant Law was enacted in 1997,1 only 16 liver transplant operations using brain dead donors have taken place. In contrast, more than 700 cases of liver transplants (with both children and adults as …

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