Responses

Download PDFPDF

Doctor or technician
Free
Compose Response

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Author Information
First or given name, e.g. 'Peter'.
Your last, or family, name, e.g. 'MacMoody'.
Your email address, e.g. higgs-boson@gmail.com
Your role and/or occupation, e.g. 'Orthopedic Surgeon'.
Your organization or institution (if applicable), e.g. 'Royal Free Hospital'.
Statement of Competing Interests

PLEASE NOTE:

  • Responses are moderated before posting and publication is at the absolute discretion of BMJ, however they are not peer-reviewed
  • Once published, you will not have the right to remove or edit your response. Removal or editing of responses is at BMJ's absolute discretion
  • If patients could recognise themselves, or anyone else could recognise a patient from your description, please obtain the patient's written consent to publication and send them to the editorial office before submitting your response [Patient consent forms]
  • By submitting this response you are agreeing to our full [Response terms and requirements]

Vertical Tabs

Other responses

Jump to comment:

  • Published on:
    Bed-side diagnosing acute appendicitis and gastrointestinal diseases
    • Sergio Stagnaro, Specialist in Blood, Gastrointestinal, and Metabolic Diseases, Rsearcher in Biophysical Semeiotics

    Dear Editor

    unfortunately doctors, all around the world, ignore the progress of physical semeiotics of last three decades, i.e. Biophysical Semeiotics (See HONCode site 233736, http:/digilander.libero.it/semeioticabiofisica).

    In fact physical semeiotics is poor, if applied to some biological systems. As far as clinical gastroenteroly is...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Author's reply

    Dear Editor

    I thank Dr Beales for his comments.[1] Clearly, it is always easy to be wise in retrospect. However, we teach students to make a diagnosis by listing the positive findings and linking these to build a coherent diagnosis.

    In case 1 the house officer noted aspirin ingestion, melaena, a hard liver edge and thrombocytopaenia. He suggested cancer of the gut with hepatic metastases. This was reason...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Physician-technicians

    Dear Editor

    I have every sympathy with Dr Neale's opinion and feel he is entirely correct in worrying about the apparently overwhelming tenadency for technological investigation and expertise instead of a more considered diagnostic and management approach. I would also agree with his view of the aspirations of many gastroenterological Specialist Registrars, apparent from talking to many of them. He has highighted the...

    Show More
    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.