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Dysbiosis in inflammatory bowel disease
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  • Published on:
    Weaning/Post-weaning dysbiosis: standardization of assay of dysbiosis is required

    Dear Editor

    Tamboli et al[1] have initiated the discussion about dysbiosis that is rather a forgotten term.

    Most of the Medical Dictionaries have yet to define this term. Dysbiosis as described by Metchnikoff (1910),[2] a colleague of Louis Pasteur, can be explained as the process rendering abnormal condition of the native gut micro-biota. Circumstances suggest that dysbiosis preceding the rotavirus...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Author's reply
    • Cyrus P Tamboli, Physician
    • Other Contributors:
      • C Neut, P Desreumaux, and J F Colombel

    Dear Editor

    We thank Dr Szilagyi for his very interesting comments regarding dysbiosis in IBD.[1]

    The main question remains as to why beneficial bacteria such as Bifidobacteria might be lacking in IBD.[2] Dr Szilagyi describes an interesting hypothesis of colonic prebiotic deficiency as a possible mechanism for dysbiosis. A suggestion is made that this deficiency could be linked to increased proximal small-...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Dysbiosis as a prerequisite for IBD

    Dear Editor

    The excellent synopsis by Tamboli et al raises the issue of the possible role of dypbiosis on the pathogenesis of IBD.[1] Although not clinically proven yet multiple studies do show benefit of the use of probiotics in both Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC).[2] These findings coupled with studies showing a reduction of lactic acid producing bacteria (LAB) in both major forms of I...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.