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A genetic test which can be used to diagnose adult-type hypolactasia in children
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  • Published on:
    Statistical points arising from Author’s Reply

    Dear Editor,

    I write as the statistician on the paper by Mulcare and collaborators [1] which was criticised by Drs Kolho and Järvelä in their "Author's Reply" eLetter to Gut Online. I wish to correct two assertions made by Drs Kolho and Järvelä. The first is their claim that our statistical procedure “contains a risk for wrong conclusions” because “adult-type hypolactasia is difficult to assess due to inaccurate d...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    Author's reply

    Dear Editor,

    Dr Swallow raises a question about another DNA-variant underlying adult- type hypolactasia in sub-Saharan populations and does not recommend the analysis of the C/T-13910 variant as a genetic test in African and non-Northern European populations. Although the studies performed by us [1-3] and others [4-5] do not support the existence of another variant, we agree with Dr. Swallow that well-conducted s...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.
  • Published on:
    DNA test for hypolactasia premature.

    Dear Editor,

    I write in response to the recently published article by Rasinperä and colleagues [1] in which a DNA test is proposed for ‘adult type hypolactasia’.

    The ability to digest the milk sugar lactose as an adult (lactase persistence) is a variable genetic trait in human populations, lactase persistence being the most frequent phenotype in northern Europe, while lactase non-persistence or ‘adult...

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    Conflict of Interest:
    None declared.