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Letter
Comment on Murphy et al: maternal obesity, pregnancy weight gain, and birth weight and risk of colorectal cancer
  1. Ravi Dhawan1,
  2. Denys Shay1,
  3. Yu Chen Zhao1,
  4. Yujia Lu1,2,
  5. Edward Giovannucci1,3
  1. 1 Department of Epidemiology, Harvard University T H Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  2. 2 Department of Global Health and Population, Harvard University T H Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  3. 3 Department of Nutrition, Harvard University T H Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
  1. Correspondence to Dr Edward Giovannucci, Department of Epidemiology, Harvard University T H Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA 02115, USA; EGIOVANN{at}hsph.harvard.edu

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We read with interest the publication in Gut by Murphy et al, 1 which elucidates in utero events, particularly maternal weight gain during pregnancy, as risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer (CRC) in adult offspring. The authors conclude that trajectories of maternal weight gain could serve as predictive markers of CRC risk in adult offspring. Despite these vital findings, the study had limitations that merit consideration.

Most notably, the low number of cases in the Child Health and Developmental Studies (CHDS) cohort necessitate further sensitivity analyses and confirmatory studies. For instance, the adjusted hazards ratio (aHR) for the association between maternal obesity and the development of CRC in adult …

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Footnotes

  • Contributors Conceptualisation, RD, DS and YCZ; writing—original draft preparation, RD DS and YCZ; writing—review and editing, RD, DS, YCZ, YL and EG; supervision, EG; project administration, EG; All authors read and agreed to the published version ofthe manuscript.

  • Funding The authors have not declared a specific grant for this research from any funding agency in the public, commercial or not-for-profit sectors.

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Patient and public involvement Patients and/or the public were not involved in the design, or conduct, or reporting, or dissemination plans of this research.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.