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Oesophageal and scaly skin lesions associated with chronic cholestatic liver disease
  1. Philipp Kasper,
  2. Tobias Goeser,
  3. Dirk Nierhoff
  1. Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
  1. Correspondence to Dr Dirk Nierhoff, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne 50937, Germany; dirk.nierhoff{at}uk-koeln.de

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Clinical presentation

A 29-year-old man presented to the hospital with progressive dysphagia and nausea. He also claimed recurrent episodes of nyctalopia (night blindness) in the past. His medical history includes a hepatocyte nuclear factor-1β gene mutation causing a chronic cholestatic liver disease.

On physical examination, epigastric tenderness was detected and there were multiple scaly plaques at the extensor sides of the upper and lower extremities (figure 1A).

Figure 1

(A) Skin lesions on the left lower leg. (B) Endoscopic view of the distal oesophagus. (C) Endoscopic view of the distal oesophagus. (D) Histology findings of distal oesophagus biopsies. …

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