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Integrated prognostic and histogenomic justification of stage-directed therapy for single large hepatocellular carcinoma: a Korean nationwide registry study
  1. Jihyun An1,
  2. Ha Il Kim2,
  3. Bora Oh3,
  4. Yoo-Jin Oh3,
  5. Ji-Hye Oh4,
  6. Wonkyung Kim4,
  7. Chang Ohk Sung5,
  8. Ju Hyun Shim6
  1. 1Department of Gastroenterology, Hanyang University, Guri, Gyeonggi-do, The Republic of Korea
  2. 2Gastroenterology, Kyung Hee University Gangdong Hospital, Gangdong-gu, Seoul, The Republic of Korea
  3. 3Asan Institute for Life Science, Asan Medical Center, Songpa-gu, Seoul, The Republic of Korea
  4. 4Medical Science, Asan Medical Institute of Convergence Science and Technology, Asan Medical Center, Songpa-gu, Seoul, The Republic of Korea
  5. 5Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, Seoul, The Republic of Korea
  6. 6Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, The Republic of Korea
  1. Correspondence to Professor Jihyun An, Department of Gastroenterology, Hanyang University, Guri, Korea (the Republic of); starlit1{at}naver.com; Professor Ju Hyun Shim, Department of Gastroenterology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Songpa-gu, The Republic of Korea; s5854{at}amc.seoul.kr

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Early diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) increases the chances of curative treatment and long-term survival.1 2 We read with interest the analytical study by Zhang et al presenting nomogram models predicting recurrence-free survival and guiding therapeutic decisions in a patient-tailored approach to treatment of early-stage HCC within Milan criteria.3 The refined Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC) guidelines no longer limit the size of solitary nodules in the definition of stage A HCC. However, there is continuing debate about the need to restrict the maximum diameter of single HCCs to inside the Milan limit (≤5 cm).4–6 In a survival-based confirmatory investigation, we primarily used a Korean nationwide cancer registry database of 10 510 new HCC cases. These cases were randomly sampled and registered in 54 hospitals, and investigated by the Korea Liver Cancer Study Group and the governmental organisation of the Korea Central Cancer Registry in 2008–2014. We included in the final analysis 1610 asymptomatic HCC subjects with BCLC stage A or stage B who had preserved liver function levels referred to as Child-Pugh class A without ascites and who initially received standard treatments as per BCLC stage (online supplemental figure S1).4 The population was divided into four groups: group 1, stage A disease fulfilling Milan criteria undergoing liver resection or transplantation, or local ablation; group 2, potential stage A with single nodules >5 cm undergoing resection; group 3, potential stage B with single nodules >5 cm undergoing transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE); and group 4, stage B undergoing TACE. Five-year overall survival (OS) rates were significantly different across the four groups (p<0.001; figure 1A). The …

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Footnotes

  • JA and HIK contributed equally.

  • Contributors JA and HIK contributed to the study concept and design, the acquisition, analysis and interpretation of data, statistical analysis, drafting of the manuscript and critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content. BO, Y-JO, J-HO, WK and COS contributed to the acquisition of data and critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content. JHS contributed to the study concept and design, interpretation of data, drafting of the manuscript, critical revision of the manuscript for important intellectual content, and supervision of the study.

  • Funding This study was supported by grants from the Basic Science Research Programme through the National Research Foundation of Korea funded by the Ministry of Science and ICT (NRF-2017R1E1A1A01074298).

  • Competing interests None declared.

  • Provenance and peer review Not commissioned; internally peer reviewed.

  • Supplemental material This content has been supplied by the author(s). It has not been vetted by BMJ Publishing Group Limited (BMJ) and may not have been peer-reviewed. Any opinions or recommendations discussed are solely those of the author(s) and are not endorsed by BMJ. BMJ disclaims all liability and responsibility arising from any reliance placed on the content. Where the content includes any translated material, BMJ does not warrant the accuracy and reliability of the translations (including but not limited to local regulations, clinical guidelines, terminology, drug names and drug dosages), and is not responsible for any error and/or omissions arising from translation and adaptation or otherwise.

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