eLetters

299 e-Letters

  • Defective denominators
    Robert A Goodlad

    Dear Editor

    We were interested to see the paper by Langlands et al, in which ‘prebiotic’ carbohydrates altered the mucosal flora,[1] but apparently had no effect on cell proliferation. The matter is of some importance as the products of in vivo fermentation (short chain fatty acids) may increase epithelial cell proliferation, leading to the possibility that such supplements could actually enhance t...

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  • DLG5 variants and susceptibility to inflammatory bowel disease in the Scottish population
    Brian L Browning

    Dear Editor,

    The recent study by Noble and colleagues[1] did not find an association of the DLG5 G113A polymorphism with either inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or Crohn’s disease (CD). Previous studies in other European populations had reported an increase in 113A allele frequency in IBD and CD patients [2,3], but, in striking contrast, Noble et al.[1] reported a trend toward decreased carrier frequency for the 1...

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  • Prediction of oesophageal varices with platelet count/spleen diameter ratio or platelets alone ?
    Dominique Thabut

    Dear Editor

    We read with a great interest the article by Giannini et al. in a recent issue of Gut.[1]

    Since the incidence of chronic liver diseases is growing, we are convinced that the development of non-invasive predictive tools to identify cirrhotic patients with oesophageal varices is of major interest. Several markers have been studied, and among them platelet count is commonly reported to be a go...

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  • This trial did not actually test IgG testing
    John O Hunter

    Dear Editor

    I agree that designing an RCT for a dietary treatment is difficult, but some of the factors that have led to this trial being criticised could have been avoided, even within the existing design of the trial.[1] For example, if all those on the 'sham diet' who did not have high levels of IgG to wheat had been asked to avoid wheat, that would have given roughly equal numbers avoiding wheat in both groups...

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  • Steatosis in Chronic Hepatitis C
    Marcello Guidi

    Dear Editor,

    we read with great interest the review by Asselah et al. (1), about the relevance of steatosis in chronic hepatitis C. They properly report that steatosis occurs more frequently in patients with chronic hepatitis C (55%) than in the general population (20-30%) of adults in the Western world (2), and that it is associated with various factors, including obesity, high alcohol consumption, diabetes melli...

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  • Repeating the same mistakes as other studies
    Andy R Weale

    Dear Editor

    We read the study by Prantera and colleagues, with great interest. As the authors assert, there have been few good quality and well designed clinical trials, with sufficient power, to examine the effects of probiotics on inflammatory bowel disease.

    This trial unfortunately also has a number of weaknesses both in its reporting and methodology.

    The report does not make clear the exact...

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  • Incidence and prevalence of ulcerative colitis in Punjab, North India
    Andrew Sawczenko

    Dear Editor

    Sood et al[1] are to be congratulated on their prospective study to determine the incidence and prevalence of ulcerative colitis in the Punjab region of India. Their study shows that ulcerative colitis may not be as rare in the Asian sub-continent as was once believed.

    We have previously reported ethnic IBD incidence data from a prospective study of over 13 million children, aged less...

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  • Authors' reply
    Nick Coleman

    Dear Editor

    We thank Goodlad for his interest in our article.[1]

    In our study[2] we assessed the expression of the three markers most commonly used to indicate cell cycle entry in tissue sections. Importantly, there was no difference in the data obtained for all three. We agree that PCNA is of limited value, for the reasons mentioned by Goodlad and also the fact that the protein has a role in DNA repa...

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  • Anal fissure treatment with Glyceryl trinitrate vs. Botulinum toxin
    Dr prem chattoo

    Dear Editor,

    We read this article with great interest. Treatment of anal fissure is really troublesome. Here the author puts emphasis on the Neuromyogenic properties of anal sphincter and treatment by topical glyceryl trinitrate, a nitric oxide donor, which decreases anal sphincter tone and improves anal mucosal blood flow and promotes the healing of anal fissures. Because of the easy application process glyceryl tri...

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  • Intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide therapy in Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis
    Zsolt Barta

    Dear Editor

    The management of refractory, severe inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is yet an unsolved problem. We read with interest the article by Stallmach and colleagues reporting safety and efficacy of intravenous pulse cyclophosphamide in acute steroid refractory IBD.[1]

    In common with other disease, the aims of therapy in IBD fall into three categories:

    (i) induction of remission;...

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